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An Employee With Integrity

Today I experienced an extraordinary example of personal responsibility and integrity. A physician’s office initiated an unauthorized product order that caused an overdraft to my bank account.  I phoned the physician’s office to rectify the problem and was told by one of the staff that I would have to speak with the office manager who, after being put on hold, indicated she would call me back. In the meantime, no credit would be issued.

Because the manager had specifically not permitted the other staff person to issue my credit in advance of a call from her personally, I anticipated the rationale I was about to hear on the call back as to why the order had been shipped and that, unfortunately, no credit would be forthcoming.

Then the call came.

The manager began the call by saying she could not call me back until she had looked into all the facts surrounding the debit and shipment and spoken with other staff members. So I not so patiently, or calmly, awaited what would follow.

Imagine my shock when the next words I heard were, “You were 1000% correct. We were wrong. We made a mistake. I am so terribly sorry but we are going to make this right. We are issuing you the credit as we speak. When you know the full harm done to your account balance, please let us know. We are going to make this right.”

In a world so bereft of personal responsibility, of people who want to blame everyone but themselves for their own errors, of employees and staff being too busy, or too unconcerned, to care about customers’ or patients’ feelings and issues, it is totally appropriate that I call this adult, ethical and professional response “extraordinary.”

Perhaps this is the sad part of the story. That doing what is ethical, honest, and just plain “right” is now the exception rather than the norm. I am not about to wax nostalgic on “the good old days” as if there was ever a time when people always did the right thing. Its illusion to think perfection ever existed.

But is undeniably true that when rapid technological innovation and social media became the replacements for Judeo-Christian values and personal human interaction, we went down a slippery slope that has landed us in a world where the witnessing of personal responsibility and integrity deserves a blog post.

But it does.

Note:  Credit goes to the practice of Dr. Anthony Bazzan at the Marcus Institute of Integrative Health of Jefferson Hospital located in Villanova, Pennsylvania. Particular honorable mention goes to his office manager, Jody.

 

 

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