Long Live The Memory of the Confederacy

There is a reason Auschwitz stands. There is a reason Jews and non-Jews visit the site. There is a reason no one leaves it untouched, shaken and forever changed. Auschwitz stands as a historical reminder of man’s inhumanity to humankind. To have leveled it would have been to erase history and lose the opportunity to learn from human error.

This is why destroying Confederate monuments, or any U.S. history, are very bad ideas. The monuments are not the problem but rather the false history we have been taught regarding what they represent.

We each know, in our own lives, that when we feel shame about behavior once participated in…well, it’s the best way to assure we won’t do it again. It is no different with our national life.

We need to let those monuments stand as testimony to the inhuman political and social perspective that they represent. The Civil War wasn’t about States’ Rights. That is simply a lie. To teach that it was is to perpetuate the lie. The Civil War was about the Confederacy’s attempt to mandate slavery not only in the then Confederate states but in any future state that would join the Confederacy. And it was an attempt to institutionalize slavery in perpetuity. If you doubt this, read the Confederate Constitution; but, at the least read these two excerpts:

Article IV Section 2(1)

“The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States; and shall have the right of transit and sojourn in any State of this Confederacy, with their slaves and other property; and the right of property in said slaves shall not be thereby impaired.” 

Article IV Section 3(3)

The Confederate States may acquire new territory; and Congress shall have power to legislate and provide governments for the inhabitants of all territory belonging to the Confederate States, lying without the limits of the several states; and may permit them, at such times, and in such manner as it may by law provide, to form states to be admitted into the Confederacy. In all such territory, the institution of negro slavery as it now exists in the Confederate States, shall be recognized and protected by Congress, and by the territorial government: and the inhabitants of the several Confederate States and Territories, shall have the right to take to such territory any slaves lawfully held by them in any of the states or territories of the Confederate states. 

As with President Trump’s statement that at the Charlottesville protests there was wrongdoing on both sides, let’s teach the truth about our history regarding both sides.

President Woodrow Wilson, the first Progressive, has perhaps more elementary and middle schools named after him nationally than any other President, including the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Wilson was an indisputable racist who segregated the U.S. Army a half century after the Civil War. Economist Bruce Bartlett writes the following:

“Similarly, when U. S. forces entered the “war to end all wars,” President Wilson may have wanted to “make the world safe for democracy” but as commander-in-chief he did so with a segregated military. World War I brought no improvement in Wilson’s policy towards blacks. They were put in segregated military units, mostly relegated to support positions, and kept out of combat.”

As for President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, consistently named as one of the top three most revered U.S. Presidents, his response to Nazi Germany was to ignore the documented atrocities of the Germans until he was forced to enter World War II. Further, Roosevelt’s response to that war was to establish his own camps here in the U.S. to round up and imprison innocent German and Asian U.S. citizens.

It isn’t history that is our enemy but false history.

How do such things happen? Well, prior to Barack Obama, Wilson was the last academic elected to the Presidency and so academia honors its own. A member of the tribe had to be portrayed as a hero not the despicable person that he was. Progressives have reigned supreme over academia ever since, at all levels of education. Hence, revisionist history as a fact of American life.

Let us teach the truth about our history. The good and the bad. There is a plethora of both. Let us glory in our good deeds and allow ourselves to fully feel the shame of those that were…well…shameful.

As a Jew, I want Auschwitz to stand. As an American, I want statues to the Confederacy to stand as well. But above all, I want the truth taught..the good, the bad and the ugly.  For it is by recalling and teaching the truth that we are liberated and uplifted, not by symbolic acts of tearing down memorials that represent revisionist history or, worse, deny it altogether.    Carole